Monday, February 13, 2012

Vinyl Record News & Music Notes

Adele Takes Home 6 Grammy Awards, Including Record of the Year, Album of the Year and Song of the Year



NEW YORK, Feb. 12, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Tonight's Grammy Awards confirmed that 2011 truly was the year of Adele. The 23 year-old singer was honored with 6 Grammy Awards, including "Record of the Year," "Album of the Year" and "Song of the Year," tying the record held by Beyoncé for most Grammy Awards won by a female artist in a single year. This brings Adele's career Grammy total to 8. Viewers who tuned into the live ceremony, which took place from the Staples Center in Los Angeles earlier this evening, witnessed Adele deliver a breathtaking rendition of "Rolling in the Deep," her first public performance since she underwent vocal surgery in November. Adele took home honors in the following categories:

Record of the Year ("Rolling in the Deep")
Album of the Year ("21")
Song of the Year ("Rolling in the Deep")
Best Pop Solo Performance ("Someone Like You")
Best Pop Vocal Album ("21")
Best Short Form Music Video ("Rolling in the Deep")

Adele's sophomore album 21 was the biggest selling album of 2011 with over 18 million units sold worldwide. Entertainment Weekly declared it "that rarest pop commodity: timeless," and the Associated Press affirmed that Adele "created more than just an album with good songs: she's crafted a masterpiece." In addition to being named Billboard's "Artist of the Year," Adele had the best-selling US single of the year, "Rolling in the Deep," certified 6x Platinum, as well as the best-selling music DVD of the year, "Live at The Royal Albert Hall," certified 7x Platinum. She has broken countless records – including becoming the first-ever artist to lead the Billboard 200 while concurrently having 3 Billboard Hot 100 #1 singles from the same parent album ("Rolling in the Deep," "Someone Like You," and "Set Fire to the Rain"). 21 has spent 19 nonconsecutive weeks, to date, at #1 on the Billboard Top 100, surpassing records held by Billy Ray Cyrus' "Some Gave All" and 1998's "Titanic" soundtrack.

SOURCE Columbia Records


Winners in selected major categories at Sunday's 54th Annual Grammy Awards:

Album of the Year: "21," Adele

Record of the Year: "Rolling in the Deep," Adele

Song of the Year: "Rolling in the Deep," Adele Adkins & Paul Epworth

New Artist: Bon Iver

Pop Vocal Album: "21," Adele

Pop Performance by a Duo or Group: "Body and Soul," Tony Bennett & Amy Winehouse

Pop Solo Performance: "Someone Like You," Adele

Rock Song: "Walk," Foo Fighters

Rock Album: "Wasting Light," Foo Fighters

Rock Performance: "Walk," Foo Fighters

R&B Song: "Fool For You," Cee Lo Green, Melanie Hallim & Jack Splash

R&B Album: "F.A.M.E.," Chris Brown

Rap Performance: "Otis," Jay-Z and Kanye West

Rap Song: "All of the Lights," Kanye West

Rap Album: "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy," Kanye West

Country Vocal Solo Performance: "Mean," Taylor Swift

Country Performance by a Duo or Group: "Barton Hollow," The Civil Wars

Country Album: "Own the Night," Lady Antebellum

Latin Pop, Rock or Urban Album: "Drama y Luz," Mana

Jazz Vocal Album: "The Mosaic Project," Terri Lyne Carrington & various artists

Opera Recording: "Adams: Doctor Atomic," Alan Gilbert, conductor

Traditional Gospel Album: "Hello Fear," Kirk Franklin

Dance Recording: "Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites," Skrillex

Dance/Electronica Album: "Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites," Skrillex

Alternative Music Album: "Bon Iver," Bon Iver

Spoken Word Album: "If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won't)," Betty White

The full winners list in all categories will be available at


Design Legacy: A Social History Of Jamaican Album Covers

Written by nhandt

Same aged Rastafarian colors… Some male with dreads… A due that refers broadly to domestic hardship or certain introspective nonetheless many in a ensue of self-critical approval or irony.

Mention Jamaican aria to someone who isn’t a fan and we can play that a unequivocally likely settlement pops into a control of your listener. Chances are this settlement looks something like a cover of Bim Sherman’s Exploitation.

For many people, this vision  —  of roots reggae and a deified lead singer —  is a customarily face that Jamaican aria has to offer. (To be honest, a Jamaican aria industry, in a fervour to benefit on a approval of this face, hasn’t finished many to criticism it.)

Dig a tiny deeper, however, and you’ll find a dozen genres unctuous underneath a tie-died aspect of roots reggae. On a publishing covers belonging to these genres, moreover, you’ll find a dozen different — and intermittently contradictory — visual images of what it has meant to be Jamaican, besides a template of a dignified Rastafarian popularized by Bob Marley. Although a reggae of a 1970s popularized a outline of domestic rebellion, we customarily have to go behind a few years surpassing to find publishing covers that unconsciously copy a values of neocolonialism — Jamaica as ominous value chest sharp to be looted by unknown interests.

Read the rest and see some fantastic album cover art at


feel good story from the northwest, vinyl is cool!


At a Eugene event, it’s clear records are gaining a new audience

By Jack Moran / The Register-Guard

University of Oregon student Erin Peterson is like a lot of people her age, members of the so-called “millenial” generation who buy songs online and carry their collections in portable media players such as an iPod.

But on Sunday, the 21-year-old journalism major took a major step or two back in time, and toward a change in the way she listens to music.

While attending the Eugene Record Convention at the Hilton Eugene, Peterson forked over $15 for a vinyl copy of The Jimi Hendrix Experience’s 1967 debut album “Are You Experienced.”

“This is actually my first record,” Peterson said. “I already have it on iTunes, but I’ve been wanting to get into records for a while.”

That’s what Tim Eringer — the Seattle record dealer who sold the classic Hendrix album to Peterson — likes to hear.

Read the rest at


and in music history for february 13th:

In 1914, the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (known as ASCAP) was formed in New York City. The society was founded to protect the copyrighted musical compositions of its members.

Born on this day in 1919, Tennessee Ernie Ford, singer and TV presenter, who had a 1955 US #1 & 1956 UK #1 single with ‘Sixteen Tons’. It was Capitol Records’ first #1 of the rock era. Ford died on October 17th 1991

Born on this day in 1920, Boudleaux Bryant, songwriter with his wife Felice. They wrote The Everly Brothers hits, "Bye Bye Love," "All I Have To Do Is Dream" and "Wake Up Little Susie" as well as "Raining In My Heart," which was a hit for Buddy Holly. Bryant died on June 25th 1987.

In 1940, Earl 'Fatha' Hines and his orchestra recorded the classic "Boogie Woogie on St. Louis Blues".

In 1955, in his first concert booked through Col. Tom Parker, Elvis Presley performed at the Fair Park Coliseum in Lubbock, Texas, billed as "The Be-Bop Western Star of the Louisiana Hayride." Also performing were Buddy & Bob, a country duo featuring 18-year-old Buddy Holly and Bob Montgomery.

In 1956, disc jockey/concert promoter Alan Freed signed a deal with Coral Records to compile and front four rock 'n' roll dance and party albums over the course of the next year.

In 1957, Cuban officials announce a ban on all Rock and Roll programs on television, calling the music "offensive to public morals and good customs." They would soften their stance a couple of days later, but strict guide lines were put in place.

In 1959, the Skyliners appeared on American Bandstand, performing their new release, "Since I Don't Have You." The song would climb to #12 on the Billboard Pop chart and #5 on the R&B chart.

In 1961, Frank Sinatra unveiled his own recording label, Reprise. Although he vowed that he would never sign any Rock artists, the label later became the home of Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, Randy Newman and The Beach Boys.

In 1961, Lawrence Welk started a two week run at #1 on the US singles chart with "Calcutta."

In 1965, Gary Lewis records "Count Me In", which will climb to #2 on the Billboard chart by next May.

In 1965, Jr. Walker and The All Stars enter the US charts for the first time with "Shotgun", which will make it to #1 on the R&B chart and #4 on the Pop chart.

In 1966, the Rolling Stones appeared on "The Ed Sullivan Show." The appearance had been taped the day before.

In 1967, the Beatles' "Penny Lane" backed with "Strawberry Fields Forever" was released in the U.S.

Penny Lane
The song's title is derived from the name of a street near Lennon's house, in the band's hometown, Liverpool. McCartney and Lennon would meet at Penny Lane junction in the Mossley Hill area to catch a bus into the centre of the city. The area that surrounds its junction with Smithdown Road is also commonly called Penny Lane. At the time, in the 1960s, this was a significant bus terminus for several routes, and buses with "Penny Lane" displayed were common throughout Liverpool.

Beatles producer George Martin has stated he believes the pairing of "Penny Lane" with "Strawberry Fields Forever" resulted in probably the greatest single ever released by the group. Both songs were later included on the US Magical Mystery Tour album in November 1967. In the UK, the pairing famously failed to reach #1 in the singles charts, stalling one place below Engelbert Humperdinck's "Release Me". In the US the song reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for a week before being knocked off by The Turtles song "Happy Together."

Strawberry Fields Forever
It was inspired by Lennon's memories of playing in the garden of a Salvation Army house named "Strawberry Field" near his childhood home

In 1969, the Doors' "Touch Me" and Sly and the Family Stone's "Everyday People" were awarded Gold records.

In 1969, Mary Hopkin released the album "Postcard." A launch party for the album was held at the Post Office Tower in London with guests including Jimi Hendrix, Donovan, Paul McCartney and his new girlfriend Linda Eastman.

In 1969, Bob Dylan recorded "Lay, Lady, Lay" at Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

In 1970, on this day, Friday the 13th, Black Sabbath released their debut self-titled studio album on Vertigo records in the UK. Peaking at #8 on the charts, the album has been recognised as the first main album to be credited with the development of the heavy metal genre. Following its US release in June 1970 by Warner Bros. Records, the album reached number 23 on the Billboard 200, where it remained for over a year, selling a million copies. In 2003, the album was ranked number 241 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time

In August 1969 the band, who were then known as Earth, decided to change their name to Black Sabbath. This was because there was another band also known as Earth; the name is also a homage to the 1963 classic Mario Bava terror film starring Boris Karloff. Around the same time they recorded and distributed a demo version of their eponymous song. In November 1969 they recorded their debut single, "Evil Woman", released in January 1970, and recorded and mixed the remaining seven songs that would appear on their debut album. According to guitarist Tony Iommi, "We just went in the studio and did it in a day, we played our live set and that was it. We actually thought a whole day was quite a long time, then off we went the next day to play for £20 in Switzerland."

Iommi recalls recording live: "We thought 'We have two days to do it and one of the days is mixing.' So we played live. Ozzy was singing at the same time, we just put him in a separate booth and off we went. We never had a second run of most of the stuff."

In 1970, six weeks after its chart debut, "One Bad Apple" by The Osmonds reaches number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. It was the first of ten Top 40 hits for the group.

In 1972 - Led Zeppelin was forced to cancel a concert in Singapore when officials wouldn't let them off the plane because of their long hair.

In 1973, during a concert in Las Vegas, Elvis Presley is suddenly taken ill. He is quickly attended to by Dr. Sidney Bowers, who was later presented with a white Lincoln Continental in appreciation for his services.

In 1976, the album, 'Frampton Comes Alive' was released by Herb Alpert's A&M Records in the U.K.

In 1981, Steve Winwood's "Arc Of A Diver" becomes the first album to be released in Britain in the new "1+1" format, which contains the artist's music on one side, while the other is left blank for the consumer to record on.

In 1981, Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon" reached a milestone as it became the rock album to spend the most consecutive weeks on the Billboard Top 200 Albums chart – 402 weeks, starting in March 1973. It finally fell off the chart in April 1988, after 724 weeks.

In 1982, the 300 pound gravestone on the grave of Lynyrd Skynyrd singer Ronnie Van Zant was stolen from an Orange Park, FL, cemetery. Police found it two weeks later in a dry river bed.

In 1988, Michael Jackson bought a ranch in Santa Ynez, California that he called "Neverland."

In 1992, it was announced that Vince Neil was leaving Mötley Crüe. Neil then sued the band for 25% of their future profits and $5 million in damages for being fired. In 1997, with Neil's solo career and Mötley Crüe's fortunes both declining, he accepted their invitation to rejoin the band.

In 1993, founder member of Musical Youth, Patrick Waite died aged 24, of natural causes (hereditary heart condition), whilst awaiting a court appearance on drug charges. Scored the 1982 UK No.1 and Grammy-nominated single 'Pass the Dutchie.'

In 1999, Blondie tops the UK chart with "Maria", giving them a British number one single in the '70s, '80s and '90s.

In 2002, country singer, songwriter Waylon Jennings died in his sleep after a lengthy fight with diabetes. Was bassist for Buddy Holly following the break-up of The Crickets. Released a series of duet albums with Willie Nelson in the late 1970s. Scored the 1980 US #21 single 'Theme From The Dukes Of Hazzard', he was also the narrator on the television series. Member of The Highwaymen with Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, and Kris Kristofferson.

In 2002, Jennifer Lopez was at #1 on the US album chart with 'Jo To Tha L-o! The Remixes.'

In 2003, Australian police find stolen material from the Beatles White Album and Abbey Road sessions that were taken in 1969.

In 2004, Led Zeppelin were awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award at this year's Grammys. Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and Jason Bonham all attended. Robert Plant did not, since he was working on a new album and tour.

At the 47th Grammy awards in 2005, Ray Charles's duets album "Genius Loves Company" won eight trophies, including Album of the Year and Record of the Year. Former Beach Boy's leader Brian Wilson won his first ever Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental for "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow" from his CD "Smile", the album he was forced to delay for nearly 40 years because of emotional problems. Led Zeppelin received a Lifetime Achievement Award. Guitarist Jimmy Page was on hand along with bassist John Paul Jones and the children of late drummer John Bonham. Other classic rockers who took home statues were Rod Stewart - Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album for "Stardust...The Great American Songbook Volume III" and Bruce Springsteen - Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance for "Code Of Silence" from his album "The Essential Bruce Springsteen".

In 2007, Rod Stewart was paid $1million when he performed at a billionaire's birthday bash. Stewart was booked to play a one-hour gig to help Steve Schwarzman celebrate his 60th birthday held at New York's Park Avenue Armory.

In 2010, Doug Fieger singer, songwriter with The Knack died after a long battle with cancer. Had the 1979 US #1 & UK #6 single "My Sharona."

In 2010, singer/songwriter/guitarist Philadelphia TV dance party host/record producer/record company executive Dale Hawkins, a cousin of fellow rockabilly pioneer Ronnie Hawkins, died of colon cancer at the age of 73.

In 2011, With appearances by Mick Jagger, Barbra Streisand, Justin Bieber and Katy Perry, the CBS broadcast of The Grammy Awards played to their largest audience in 10 years. 26.55 million viewers tuned in to see Country trio Lady Antebellum win Song Of The Year and Record Of The Year with "Need You Now".

birthdays today include (among others): Peter Tork (Monkees) (68), Scott Smith (Loverboy) (57), Les Warner (Cult) (51), Ed Gagliardi (Foreigner) (60), Peter Hook (Joy Division, New Order) (56) and Peter Gabriel (62)

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